PC POWERPLAY 22, February 1998, Australia: Technology that Makes the Magic, Playguide, and Creator’s Paradise

The arrival of Quake 2 signalled the end of just about everything else (other games, a social life, personal hygiene) for at least 6 months, as well as being another great leap forward to Upgrade Time for those with non-meaty PCs. Watching the phenomenon blossom is intriguing, though plotting its course is a no brainer. As expected, the online community swung into action from the outset. The existing 7.8 million or so Quake fan/news sites embraced the second coming with gusto, providing up-to-the-minute news and downloads... Quake 2’s long term value has been assured even only a few weeks after its release. There are enough hacks turned editor out there to sink the proverbial ship and the rate of people having a dabble is increasing every day. How long will Quake 2 last? Well let’s just say that if you played every single level, used every patch, made your own levels, played every TC you would be very old by the time you had finished. You would also die very happy. 

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PC POWERPLAY 27, August 1998, Australia: Do-It-Yourself LAN Parties by Munley Leong

LAN (Local Area Network) parties can be fantastic experiences, but they can also be difficult to set up and run. Fear not though, Munly Leong will walk you through it. What is a LAN Party? A LAN (Local Area Network) party is basically a local network get together. A bunch of people bring over their computer somewhere, hook them all up, play network games and engage in other network-ish activities. Why a LAN party? No matter how much fun playing against the computer A I is, nothing beats the adrenaline rush from playing a live, thinking (usually) human being.

Multiplayer United: Photos from MPU LANs, Sydney, Australia

Multiplayer United (MPU) is a Local Area Network (LAN) gaming group located in the Sydney Australia area. Typically MPU runs from 11:00am until 11:00pm on a monthly basis. For details of the next MPU event check the next event page. Currently any number of the latest games are supported on a fast 10/100 m/s network. The benefit of network gaming is that you can play against your friends, enemies and total strangers alike, in a friendly, fast and exciting environment. You can meet your online pals and discuss strategies or just go hard and game for the whole 12 hours ignoring all. The atmosphere we strive for at MPU is one of friendliness with a touch of competitiveness.

Australian Quake 2 Clan Oxygen: What is the Online Quake Scene? (for the Absolute Newbie)

The online quake scene, in its simplest form, is a bunch of people who all like playing the same game against each other (or with each other) over the internet. Clans are really just a group of people who get along well together, frag well together, share a common interest, organise wars, have fun and muck around. The last thing you need to know, is how to express your emotions - be it in the game, on message boards, in email or sms - from now on, smilies will be the tool you use to show your heartfelt pleasure, absolute disgust, indifference or sheer joy about the goings on in your world.

OZQuake: Fraggin Australian Style…

The community is still strong in Australia. There are still some great servers around the country, including our own (202.139.41.242:27951), that have regular groups of players who hang out and have a frag or two.

Instagib seems to be the mod of the moment, a server side mod (no download needed, you just connect and play) with our own server, Alphalink (203.24.205.19:27911), Wireplay (202.12.147.16:27999) and EISA (203.166.224.41:27930) being the pick of the pack.

GX is still going strong, something about the skill and discipline of the game keeps people keen, and Alphalink (203.24.205.19:27950) is without doubt the bees knees for game-play.

Quake II LIVES!!

Queensland Gaming League Quake Champions LAN Finals 2000

An indoor basketball arena at Brisbane's ANZ Stadium was converted into the venue for a gigantic makeshift computer network comprised of over 350 connected computers -- making it the largest gaming LAN (Local Area Network) Australia has ever seen.

 With competitors from both Queensland and interstate, the gaming was fast and furious across a number of different popular game titles including Quake III, Halflife Counterstrike, Nascar Rally 3, Age of Empires II and Starcraft. All players were eager for a share in the thousands of dollars on offer.

"You always have to expect issues when putting on an event like this but thanks to Cisco who flew us up a router, the network has been extremely fast and very stable," Key event organiser and QGL founder, Adam "Term" Williams said. "Everything has been running on time and according to plan" Two professional Australian gamers, Andrew "Python" Cha Cha and Robert "Lobsta" Campbell, both absent from the QGL event due to last minute training, are heading to Dallas, Texas later this month to compete in the CyberAthlete Professional League Tournament. With over $100,000 in cash prizes on offer, the tournament takes gaming to a whole new level.