Quake II Magazine Archive: id Software ⁠— Quake 4

"If I concentrate really hard, then at the back of my peripheral vision I can just about make out the swish of a ponytail as Todd Hollenshead, CEO of id Software, shakes his head in dismay. 'No, your other right. Over there. The red armour,' he sighs, as I nervously jab the WASD of Quake 4 deathmatch, walking into walls, falling off ledges, and getting hurled into walls through faulty jump-pad use. I've been marked out as a player of remedial standards and Hollenshead is doing his utmost to make me less of a loser. It's horrible, and hard as I push myself I just can't concentrate. It's truly the stuff of nightmares. I'm playing Quake in front of the men from id ⁠— and the men from id think that I'm a noob. Freud would have a field day."

PC Zone Feature — Gaming at Work: A Frag Too Far? Adam Phillips investigates

"As long as Bill Gates continues to churn out bloatware requiring increasingly obscene amounts of processor power to run it, corporations are going to need the latest high-spec machines — offering office employees an enviable opportunity to multiplay with the latest games in company time. In other words, why use that kick-ass P400 Super-Mega PC for spreadsheeting and word processing, when you can use it to beat seven shades of productivity out of your workmates across the company network with a game of Quake II?"

PC Zone 59, January 1998: Quake II Review, by David McCandless

This review needs no introduction. So says David McCandless. This is not going to be a review in the traditional sense. You can gen up on the plot when you buy the game. You can see that Quake II looks marvelous, wondrous and realistic from the screenshots, and if you've played the Q2Test, you already know what Quake II feels like to play. It feels scary. It feels like it really is you versus hordes of "them." One false move and you will die, be you pale-faced newbie or designer-stubbled veteran.